RideWell Bike Festival This Sunday at Holy Trinity Parish

Patron Saint of Cyclists

Patron Saint of Cyclists

Holy Trinity Parish is holding  “RideWell Bike Festival” this Sunday, October 19 at their church located at 515 E Ponce de Leon Ave in Decatur. The event begins at 1 pm and features a 17 mile and a 5 mile Bicycle Tour of Community Gardens, a Children’s Bicycle Rodeo and a Bike blessing. The proceeds will benefit Clean Water Programs in Haiti. Tickets are $10 per person with $20 max for family and are available at the church.

RideWell is Holy Trinity’s celebration of the feast day of the Madonna_del_Ghisallo, Patroness of cyclists.

For more information visit http://ridewell.tumblr.com/

Decatur Third Friday Fun Bike Ride This Friday!

Join Decatur Active Living for our Third Friday Fun Bike Ride this Friday, October 17th at 6:30 pm. We will meet at the Church Street MARTA Station and are ready to ride at 6:30 pm. All levels of riders are welcome on this no-drop conversational pace ride. No one will be left behind!! This is a great ride for those who are tentative about riding in groups and/or on the street.

After the ride we will visit a local watering hole for refreshments and a chance to make some new friends.

Helmets are required. Consider lighting up your bike with lots of lights for the ride. The days are getting shorter. I have a battery operated string of lights I am looking forward to wrapping around my bike!

Check out the Meet-up page, courtesy of the Southern Bicycle League. Walt and Joanne are going to join us this week!

Photo courtesy of midlifeblogspot.com.

Photo courtesy of midlifeblogspot.com.

Register Your Bikes and Learn to Be Safe on October 18

DHA Bike Safety Event 10-18-14

Safety Tips for Bicyclists

DSC07144

The weather is almost perfect for dusting off the bike and hitting the road. Here are some safety tips to consider before heading out:

Always Ride with Traffic and Follow the Rules of the Road

  • You are better off riding with the flow of traffic, not against it.
  • You are more predictable and visible to motorists, especially at intersections and  driveways
  • Ride in a straight line, not in and out of cars, and use hand signals when turning and stopping
  • Obey traffic signs, signals, and lane markings and yield to traffic when appropriate, including pedestrians.

Don’t Ride on the Sidewalk!!

  • Although you might think it is a safer option, motorists are simply not looking for bicyclists on the sidewalk, especially those riding against the flow of traffic.
  • At very driveway and intersection, you are at greater risk of being hit by a motorist than if you were riding on the road wtih traffic.
  • Pedestrians will thank you for riding on the road as well
  • Ride on the trail, paved shoulder, bike lane or bike route. You still need to follow the rules of the road and watch out for your fellow travelors. Ride to the right, signal your turns, obey traffic signs and signals.

Be Predictable and Visible

  • Try not to be hesitant or do things that motorists and other travelers may not be expecting
  • Make sure everyone can see you and knows where you are and where you are going.
  • If riding in the dark, use headlights, taillights and reflectors and wear reflective materials and brightly colored clothing.
  • Do not wear headphones or talk on a cell phone while bicycling.

Watch for Turning Traffic

  • Most car/bike collisions happen at intersections and driveways when motorists or bicyclists are turning
  • At every intersection and driveway, keep a careful eye out for motorists turning right in front of you – you may be going faster than you think. Also, look for motorists turning left across your path. Drivers are looking for gaps in traffic and may not be paying attention to anything other than other motor vehicles.

 

Wear a helmet!!

Be cool wear a helmet

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Safety Tips for Bicyclists, from Pedestrian & Bicycle Information Center. http://www.pedbikeinfo.org

 

 

 

Bike Safely: Signaling

You should always let people know when you are turning, changing lanes, or stopping.

Communicating your intensions is not only makes your ride safer, but it is also required by law in the United States.

Left Turn: Fully extend your left arm out to the side

Right Turn: Fully extend your right arm out to the side or bend your left arm up at a right angle with your hand flat.

Slowing or Stopping: Extend your left arm out at a right angle with your hand open

Changing Lanes on a Bicycle Safely

Changing lanes in traffic can be challenging. Here’s how you can change lanes with confidence:

  • Plan ahead, anticipate where you are going to need to be on the road
  • Look behind you, possibly several times
  • Signal where you are going
  • Act carefully, smoothly and deliberately

Bike Safety – Riding on the Sidewalk

Another great video from the League of American Bicyclists:

Be super careful if you have to ride on the sidewalk. It is not the safest choice in most cases.

Cycling “Rules of the Road”

Peter Wakefield the "Bike Dude"

Peter Wakefield the “Bike Dude”

The League of American Bicyclist’s five “Rules of the Road” are the core of the  Smart Cycling program and will prepare you for a safe and fun bike commute no matter where you are riding.

Follow the Law

Your safety and image of  bicyclists depend on you. You have the same rights and duties as  drivers. Obey traffic signals and stop signs. Ride with traffic; use the  rightmost lane headed in the direction you are going.

Be Predictable

Make  your intentions clear to everyone on the road. Ride in a straight line  and don’t swerve between parked cars. Signal turns, and check behind you  well before turning or changing lanes.

Be Conspicuous

Ride  where people can see you and wear bright clothing. Use a front white  light, red rear light and reflectors when visibility is poor. Make eye  contact with others and don’t ride on sidewalks.

Think Ahead

Anticipate  what drivers, pedestrians, and other people on bikes will do next.  Watch for turning vehicles and ride outside the door zone of parked  cars. Look out for debris, potholes, and other road hazards. Cross  railroad tracks at right angles.

Ride Ready

Check  that your tires have sufficient air, brakes are working, chain runs  smoothly, and quick release levers are closed. Carry tools and supplies  that are appropriate for your ride. Wear a helmet.

For more information on the League of American Bicyclists, click here.

Bicycle Safely to School

crossing to schoolParents, please help your children to bicycle safely to school by following this simple rule:

When children and parents approach a crosswalk (crossing guard present) on a bicycle they should dismount and walk across the street. If they stay on their bikes they will be considered a vehicle and they will have to obey all traffic laws, such as stopping at stop signs, yielding, riding with traffic, etc. This is for the safety of both the children and the guard.

We look forward to working with all the schools this year  through the Safe Routes to School Program. All the schools have a school Champion. Let them know if you are interested in serving ont he SRTS committee and/or volunteering to help with events or walking with children in the Walking School Buses. For more info on SRTS click here.

Georgia Bicycling Rules of the Road

th

Since it is National Bike Month, it is a great time to review the Rules of the Road.

  • Bicycles are vehicles and MUST obey traffic laws! Traffic laws that apply to vehicles also apply to bicycles. Bicyclists must obey stop signs, speed limits and traffic signals just as they would if driving a car.
  • In Groups, ride no more that two abreast and as a courtesy ride single file when traffic is present in your travel direction.
  • Ride on the right. Georgia Law states that bicyclists should ride as near to the right side of the roadways as possible. Bicyclists can move from the right when turning left, when avoiding hazards, when the lane is too narrow to share safely with a motor vehicle, when traveling the same speed as traffic and when passing another vehicle.
  • At night, be seen!  Every bicycle must be equipped with a white front light and a rear red reflector, each visible from 300 feet. Rear red lights may be use as well.
  • Don’t hit the road without a helmet! Bicycle helmets are a good idea for everyone, and required by law for every bicycle rider younger than age 16. They must be fastened on securely.
  • Three Foot Rule. Motorists are required to pass cyclists by a distance of at least three feet.

Let’s all obey these rules and stay safe!

Decatur Active Living and Bike Decatur have produced a Bicycle Suitability Map for the city rating the road conditions for cycling as well as showing the location of bike lanes, water and bike parking. You can download one here, or stop by the Decatur Recreation Center or the Visitors Center to pick one up.