Trail Etiquette: Share the Trail

With more  people using the PATH it is a good time to review trail etiquette.Let’s make sure everyone has a good ride or walk. These tips are from the League of American Bicyclists……

Courtesy

  • Respect all trail users
  • Yield to slower users
  • Obey the rules of the trail

Announce when passing

  • Use a bell, horn or voice to indicate your intention to pass
  • Warn other well in advance so you do not startle them

Yield when entering and crossing

  • Yield to traffic at places where the trail crosses the road
  • Yield to other users at trail intersections

Keep Right

  • Stay as close to the right as possible, except when passing

Pass on Left

  • Pull out only when you are sure the lane is clear
  • Allow plenty of room, about two bike lengths, before moving back to the right

Be Predictable

  • Travel in a straight line unless you are avoiding hazards or passing
  • Indicate your intention to turn or pass

Use Lights at Night

  • Most trial users will not have lights at night; use a white front and red rear light.

Do not block the trail

  • For group rides, use no more than half the trail
  • Stop and regroup completely off the trail

Move It Monday: Get Your Groove On

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Dancing is a whole-body workout that is actually fun! It’s good for your heart, it makes you stronger, and it will help with balance and coordination. There are a lot of ways in which you can work on your dance moves – on your own, with a friend or partner or in a class setting. Experiment with different styles of dance and choreography to get a feel for what you enjoy the most.

Read more about the benefits of dancing here.

Summer Solstice FREE Yoga Tomorrow!

DSC01928Celebrate the start of summer with a Summer Solstice Yoga practice tomorrow, June 24 at 9 am with Cheryl Burnette and Mamie Mabery.

Enjoy yoga on the courtyard at Beacon Center, located between the Police Station and Ebster Recreation Center, 420 W Trinity Place. If it rains, we will practice in the Ebster gymnasium. Entrance to the gym is on Electric Avenue.

The event is FREE, however we will gladly take donations for  the Mary Miller Decatur Youth Fund which ensures that children are able to attend after-school programs and camps by giving scholarships to those in need.

Lunch & Learn: Revitalized, Rejuvenated & Rarin’ To Go!! Tomorrow at 11:30am – Decatur Rec

Rarin to Go

Multi-Use Path Etiquette

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Photo from Creative Loafing

The right way to ride on a multi-use path, from Bicycling.com:

Multi-use paths are being added to cities across the country at an exciting rate and more people are using them. That’s a great thing. But crowding can lead to conflict. To stay safe, and make the experience more enjoyable for everyone, here are a few guidelines for blissfully sharing bike paths with fellow cyclists, joggers, dog walkers, and everyone else.

1. Get out of time-trial mode, duh. It’s fun to go fast, but a bike path isn’t the place to race. Yes, you can crank things up a bit if you have clear sight lines and few other users but, as a general rule, keep it under control.


3. Slow down—and be prepared to stop—when there are others around.
People are unpredictable. Kids and pets especially, but the truth is, anyone can be so involved in a conversation or wrapped up in their own thoughts that they’ll make a bad choice even if they hear you coming. Slow to a walking pace and keep your hands on your brakes.

4. Make some noise well before passing. A bell is more charming (and less startling) than an “on your left!” but either is preferable to a stealth pass. Make noise—be sure you’re heard—well before you reach the person you’re passing.

5. Look around (and signal!) before passing or stopping. Just because you’re doing it right doesn’t mean everyone else is. Before you swing left to pass or hit the brakes to stop, throw out a hand signal, and take a look behind you for oncoming traffic.

6. Don’t stand in the path. Sometimes it’s nice to stop and look around and take a drink. Pull off the path when you do so, otherwise you’ll block the way for everyone else.

7. Be nice. It’s the most important thing. You’re representing cyclists as a group. Don’t be a stone-faced automaton hell-bent on maintaining your 19.5 mph pace. Treat people the way you want to be treated. Be friendly. Wave. Say hello. It will make all of our time on these super paths a little more fun.

Traffic Laws for Safer Biking

From the League of American Bicyclists:

In all 50 states, people on bikes are required to follow the same laws as other drivers.

Here are a few key principles that underpin all US traffic laws:

First Come, First Served
Everyone on the road is entitled to the lane width they need. This includes the space behind, to each side and the space in front. If you want to use someone else’s space you must yield to whoever is using it.

Ride on the Right
In the United States, everyone must drive on the right-hand side of the roadway.

Yielding to Crossing Traffic
When you come to an intersection, if you don’t have the right of way, you must yield.

Yielding when Changing Lanes
If you want to change lanes, you must yield to traffic that is in your new lane of travel.

Speed Positioning
The slowest vehicles on the road should be the furthest to the right. Where you position yourself on the road depends on the location of any parked cars, your speed, and your destination. Always pass on the left.

Lane Positioning
Bikes can share the same lane with other drivers. If a lane is wide enough to share with another vehicle (about 14 feet), ride three feet to the right of traffic. If the lane is not wide enough to share, “take the lane” by riding in the middle.

Intersection positioning
When there is a lane that is used for more than one direction, use the rightmost lane going in the direction you are traveling.

Follow all street signs, signals, and markings

For State specific bicycle laws, click here.

Move It Monday: Reach for Better Posture

monday temp

Good posture helps you maintain correct form while exercising, which results in fewer injuries and greater gains! Working on balance can strengthen your abilities in tennis, golf, running, dancing, skiing, walking – and just about any other sport or activity. The good news: You can improve your posture with a few simple exercises.

Read more about the benefits of improving your posture and some tips on how to do so here.

Social Justice Films has a NEW time Tomorrow!!

Social Justice Films through the Decades (2)

Consider Donating School Supplies for Students in Need

back-to-School (002)

Decatur Recreation Center is one of the drop-off locations for The Champion’s School Supply Drive. Consider donating some school supplies for those in need. You could make a difference in a child’s school experience.

Tips for Driving Around People on Bikes

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With more and more bikes on our streets, it is important for drivers to know how to drive safely around cyclists. These safety tips come from our friends at Georgia Bikes.

  • Give bikes at least 3 feet of safe distance when passing or following. The State of Georgia has a Three-Foot law.
  • Bicycles are vehicles and allowed on all roadways.
  • When making turns, watch for and yield to people on bikes.
  • Do not park in or block a bike lane.
  • Check mirrors before opening doors, especially if parked  next to a bike lane.
  • Be alert, cautious, and attentive when driving. Do not drive distracted.

For more information on cycling in Decatur visit http://www.decaturga.com/biking.