2021 RWTD 5K Poster(s) Unveiled

Artist Adam Pinsley has done it again – he has created another great poster for the annual Run With the Dogs 5k. Well, actually there are two! This year’s “dog of honor” is Milo, a very well behaved AussieOllie (part Australian Shepard and part border collie.) The poster was unveiled on Wednesday, with the artist, Milo and his family present.

Run with the Dogs 5K is an annual fundraiser of the Decatur Bulldogs Boosters and supports the athletic programs at Decatur High School and Renfroe Middle School.

The Boosters raise money annually to meet the needs of student athletes, including uniforms and equipment. These funds are used to support 685 student athletes on all 25 teams representing 14 sports at Decatur High and Renfroe Middle Schools.

The 5K run/walk race will be a bit different than previous years. Register now, and you can run the race any time between January 23 and 31, 2021. You can report your time through Chronotrack.  T-shirts and award pick up days will be Feb. 13 from 10 a.m.-noon and Feb. 14 from 2-3 p.m. The team is also working on a t-shirt pick-up during the race window for participants who register before Jan 4, 2021.

 Visit www.rwtd5k.com for more information and registration. All entry fees are non-refundable.

When it comes to fitting in your walk, get creative!

You don’t have to do your 30 minutes of daily physical activity all in one shot. Find creative ways to incorporate more walking into your normal routine.

Daily physical activity is the foundation of a healthy lifestyle, and it’s recommended that able-bodied adults get in at least 30 minutes of exercise—whether it be walking, jogging, running, weight training, or dance—five days a week.

But what if you don’t have a 30-minute block of time to spare? Well, you don’t have to do all your physical activity in one shot. Many times, it’s actually easier and more convenient to work in those low-intensity movements throughout the day. All it takes is a little creativity.

One of the best ways to boost your step count is to incorporate as much walking into your daily routine as possible. For example, when you’re out and about running errands, try parking farther away from the grocery store, veterinarian, shopping center, etc.; you’d be surprised how many steps you can accrue making this one tiny adjustment. A socially distanced walk with friends or family is another way to get moving. Use your next coffee date as another opportunity to get in extra steps.

Even shopping can be a source of physical activity. Save your online ordering for another week, and try going to the mall, where you can briskly move from store to store. And let’s say the weather is dark or damp or just dreary, well, there’s an easy solution — get your walk in at home. The next time you’re tidying up, preparing a meal, or streaming Netflix, consider taking an additional lap or two around the house. If you’re able to use your stairs without discomfort, go up and down a couple extra times.

This Monday, use your imagination and think about how you can effortlessly add more steps to your daily routine.

Decatur Active Living Wins Awards!

Decatur Active Living won three awards from the Georgia Recreation and Parks Association. Awards were announced at the annual conference in October and were presented at the November 16th virtual City Commission meeting.

Sara Holmes, Adult Program Supervisor is the proud recipient of the prestigious Mike Daniel Award. The award is given to a professional that exemplifies excellence at the programming level. It is presented in memory of Mike Daniel, a leader in our field, who strived during his career for the highest level of achievement in programming. The award is reserved for individuals who have excelled in situations where they are primarily responsible for the supervision or implementation of recreation, parks or leisure programs.

Lee Goldsmith, volunteer at the Oakhurst Dog Park, won the Volunteer of the Year Award. This award recognizes volunteers whose efforts have had lasting effects on recreation and leisure programs. Lee has been a long-time champion at the dog park, and organizes work days to keep the park clean and safe.

Decatur Active Living won the Marketing and Visibility Publication Award for Online Media for the “Staying active during COVID” blog posts on BeActiveDecatur.com.

Bubble Soccer Comes to Decatur!

Register online at www.decaturga.com/webtrac

November 13 is World Kindness Day

From NationalToday.com:

World Kindness Day is an international holiday that was formed in 1998, to promote kindness throughout the world and is observed annually on November 13 as part of the World Kindness Movement. It is observed in many countries including the United States, Canada, Japan, Australia and the U.A.E. World Kindness Day presents us with the opportunity to reflect upon one of the most important and unifying human principles. On a day devoted to the positive potential of both large and small acts of kindness, try to promote and diffuse this crucial quality that brings people of every kind together. 

Read about the history and more here.

InspireKindness.com has a list of simple things to do to be kind.

“The world is full of kind people. If you can’t find one, be one.” – Unknown

Destress With Belly Breathing

From our friends at Mondaycampaigns.org:

Behavior change is hard, but there are some simple strategies that can make adopting a healthy lifestyle easier. Reduce stress and improve your sleep through exercise, meditation, and mindfulness. Deep breathing and belly breathing are two techniques to help deal with stress. Try to think positive – surround yourself with positive people, find humor, be kind to yourself, and identify areas that need to change. See a mental health professional if you are feeling worried, anxious, or overwhelmed most of the time and these feelings are interfering with your normal life.

Read about more ways to reduce stress here.

Children and Bicycle Safety

Bicycle riding is fun, healthy, and a great way to be independent. It is important to remember that a bicycle is not a toy; it’s a vehicle!

Safe Riding Tips from one.nhtsa.gov:

Before using your bicycle, make sure it is ready to ride. You should always
inspect your bike to make sure all parts are secure and working properly.


Remember to:
Wear a Properly Fitted Bicycle Helmet. Protect your brain, save your life. For more information see the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration publication “Easy Steps to Properly Fit a Bicycle Helmet.”
Adjust Your Bicycle to Fit. Stand over your bicycle. There should be 1 to 2 inches between you and the top tube (bar) if using a road bike and 3 to 4 inches if a mountain bicycle. The seat should be level front to back. The seat height should be adjusted to allow a slight bend at the knee when the leg is fully extended. The handlebar height should be at the same level with the seat.

Check Your Equipment. Before riding, inflate tires properly and check that your brakes work.

See and Be Seen. Whether daytime, dawn, dusk, foul weather, or at night, you need to be seen by others. Wearing white has not been shown to make you more visible. Rather, always wear neon, fluorescent, or other
bright colors when riding day or night. Also wear something that reflects light, such as reflective tape or markings, or flashing lights. Remember, just because you can see a driver doesn’t mean the driver can see you.

Control Your Bicycle. Always ride with at least one hand on the handlebars. Carry books and other items in a bicycle carrier or backpack.

Watch for and Avoid Road Hazards. Be on the lookout for hazards such as potholes, broken glass, gravel, puddles, leaves, and dogs. All these hazards can cause a crash. If you are riding with friends and you are in the lead, yell out and point to the hazard to alert the riders behind you.

Avoid Riding at Night. It is far more dangerous to ride at night than during the day because you are harder for others to see. If you have to ride at night, wear something that makes you more easily seen by others. Make sure you have reflectors on the front and rear of your bicycle (white lights on the front and red rear reflectors are required by law in many States), in addition to reflectors on your tires, so others can see you.

For more information on bicycle safety, visit the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) Web site at: http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov

Many bicycle-related crashes resulting in injury or death are associated with the bicyclist’s behavior, including suchthings as not wearing a bicycle helmet, riding into a street without stopping, turning left or swerving into traffic that is coming from behind, running a stop sign, and riding the wrong way in traffic. To maximize your safety, always wear a helmet AND follow the rules of the road.

Bike Helmet Safety – You Make the Call

Take a few minutes to watch this bicycle helmet safety video with your children. The video was created as a collaborative effort of the Johns Hopkins Children’s Injury Prevention Network and features Baltimore children.

Basic Dog Obedience classes start this Saturday, Nov. 7

This 3-week class helps owners work together with their dogs to become confident and happy companions.  The focus is on learning and practicing basic dog obedience manners as well as solving behavioral problems such as jumping, pulling & barking.  The course will also focus on ways to stimulate your dog’s brain to build your dog’s confidence and calmness.  Dogs need to be at least 5 months old and have all their vaccinations.  The class is outdoors and limited to 5 dog/human teams – humans will need to wear masks at all times – no sharing of training equipment – and we will practice social distancing of 6-10 ft of separation between participants. This class is not appropriate for dogs reactive to other dogs on a leash. Click the link below to register.

Kaiser Permanente Virtual Bingo tomorrow at 11am

RSVP to the link provided below. Once you are registered you will receive a link to join and your bingo card!

https://kpsabingo.wixsite.com/decaturactiveadults